Home / Gadgets / Safety warning over trendy £100 blender: NutriBullet users claim the kitchen gadget 'used by Kate and Wills' can … – Daily Mail

Safety warning over trendy £100 blender: NutriBullet users claim the kitchen gadget 'used by Kate and Wills' can … – Daily Mail

Bernadette Brown, who lives in Brighton, had bought the 15 piece NutriBullet Pro 900 series extractor to make smoothies

Bernadette Brown, who lives in Brighton, had bought the 15 piece NutriBullet Pro 900 series extractor to make smoothies

It is the trendy kitchen gadget championed by celebrities that costs three times more than a standard blender and is purportedly the Duchess of Cambridge’s ‘secret weapon’ for staying in shape.

However, in recent weeks there have been several reports of people getting injured when using their NutriBullet power blender.

In the latest incident Bernadette Brown, a mother-of-one from Brighton, couldn’t get her machine to turn off and smoke started ‘ploughing out’ of it. 

Ms Brown had purchased the 15-piece NutriBullet Pro 900 series extractor – which retails at £99 – to make smoothies as part of a health kick.  

The kitchen gadget, which can smash and blend fruit, vegetables and nuts into nutritious drinks, has become hugely popular since its launch in the UK in 2013, helped by the power of celebrity. 

But there have been recent instances of people sustaining burns, blisters and cuts after their device exploded.

Describing her problems with the machine, Ms Brown, a business psychologist, told MailOnline this week: ‘My friend had a NutriBullet when I was living with her, but after she moved out I bought a NutriBullet 900 series of my own.

The kitchen gadget has become hugely popular since its launch in the UK in 2013

The kitchen gadget has become hugely popular since its launch in the UK in 2013

‘I used it once or twice a week since buying it from Amazon in April last year and only ever used it for five to 10 seconds at a time. 

‘I bought it to make smoothies and tended to put cold vegetables in the machine. I never put anything hot in there. 

‘A few weeks ago I had put vegetables and water in it, but it wouldn’t stop and I could not get it to turn off and I was freaking out. 

‘Smoke was ploughing out from it and I had to turn it off at the wall. I was lucky the socket was next to me so I didn’t have to lean over to switch it off otherwise I don’t know what would have happened.’

BRITAIN’S TRENDIEST KITCHEN GADGET

The kitchen gadget is at the centre of many people’s New Year health regime.

It has become hugely popular since its launch in the UK in 2013, helped by the power of celebrity.

Famous names including Ruth Langsford, Lucy Watson, Abbey Clancy and Freddie Flintoff are all said to be users. Even the Duchess of Cambridge is rumoured to have one.  

Health food bloggers and authors such as Delicioulsy Ella, Niomi Smart and the Hemsley Sisters have also sung the praises of a device that has become a best-seller for John Lewis.

She added: ‘I just got out of the kitchen after turning it off and I told my son [who is in his early 40s] not to go in there.

‘When I told Amazon what had happened, they told me to send it back and they would replace it…but then I looked it up online and saw other people had problems with it and so I thought I don’t know if I want to buy another one as it seems unsafe.

‘The manufacturer don’t seem interested.’   

MailOnline have contacted NutriBullet for a comment. 

Martyn Allen of Electrical Safety First, the product safety charity, told MailOnline: ‘We advise anyone who is buying a new electrical product to purchase from a reputable retailer and to read product instructions carefully before use. 

‘Sophisticated fake electrical products such as counterfeit Nutribullets are widely available on online marketplaces such as eBay and Amazon. 

‘Despite appearing more convincing than ever, fake electrical products can contain less than half the internal components required to run safely. The best way to guarantee an item’s legitimacy is to buy directly from official online retailers.

‘Furthermore, if you notice anything unusual about how your appliance is working (e.g. smoke) our advice is to turn off the power supply and contact the manufacturer immediately. If you have purchased through a reputable retailer, the product can be traced and any fault can be investigated immediately.’  

Richard Moore, 27, from south-east London, said his NutriBullet machine exploded when he was making a cold smoothie

Richard Moore, 27, from south-east London, said his NutriBullet machine exploded when he was making a cold smoothie

The 27-year-old film producer was left with burns and blisters on his face, neck and hands

The 27-year-old film producer was left with burns and blisters on his face, neck and hands

Ms Brown’s warning comes after Richard Moore, a film producer, suffered burns and blisters after his machine shattered, showering his hands and face with shards of plastic and burning liquid.

Mr Moore, 27, from south-east London, said the machine exploded when he was making a cold smoothie – using peanut butter, honey, and coconut milk – recommended by NutriBullet.   

He was making a smoothie with his wife, Ramla, when he said the blades starting moving faster than usual and it started to smoke.

He turned it off, but was too late and the machine exploded leaving him with burns and blisters on his face, neck and hands.

Wendy Littlefield, from Nevada, has sued Homeland Housewares, who manufacture and distribute the kitchen gadget after she sliced her right hand

Wendy Littlefield, from Nevada, has sued Homeland Housewares, who manufacture and distribute the kitchen gadget after she sliced her right hand

The 27-year-old freelance film producer, said: ‘It felt like my hands were on fire.

‘I was told that the burning liquid had effectively rested on the top of the nerves without actually destroying them, so that it just continued to burn the nerve. 

‘Apparently it would have been less painful if it had gone straight through the flesh.’ 

And in a further incident last week, Wendy Littlefield, from Henderson in Nevada, sued the company after claiming the device exploded which led to the spinning blades chopping her right hand.

She had used the NutriBullet 900 series machine to blend canned tomatoes and beans.

However, in a lawsuit, she said the device ‘suddenly malfunctioned’, causing severe injuries to her right hand which left her with severe nerve damage and cuts.

She claimed her injuries were caused by the negligence of Homeland Housewares, who manufacture and distribute the kitchen gadget.  

She said they should have known the machines were ‘unreasonably dangerous and defective when used for its intended use’.

She claims she is entitled to compensation – for an amount yet to be determined – as well as general damages for pain, suffering, emotional distress and disfigurement.

In her lawsuit, her attorneys at Abir Cohen Treyzon Salo, LLP, said she had incurred medical and hospital bills and will require further medical care for the injuries she sustained.  

Her husband Darryl also alleges that, as a result of his wife’s injuries, their ‘marital association has been altered’.

He also claimed to have suffered ‘mental anguish’ from seeing his wife sustain the horrific injuries to her hand. 

Wendy, pictured with daughter Cambrie, who described how 'she rides a roller coaster of never-ending pain'

Wendy, pictured with daughter Cambrie, who described how ‘she rides a roller coaster of never-ending pain’


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